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Ross and Kentfield Creek Project Moves Forward

This project, affecting Corte Madera Creek from the vicinity of Lagunitas Bridge to the lower end of the concrete channel, is in the feasibility study phase in partnership between the US Army Corps of Engineers and Marin County Flood Control District. Project managers have released a publicity flyer to inform the public about the planning process: CorteMaderaCreekScopingFlyerFeb2016.pdf

Big Fish Caught on Camera!

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Thanks to Maureen Groper’s donation of a wildlife camera to Friends, we have a record of a very large salmonid passing Nokomis Bridge in San Anselmo in the evening of December 19. The fish was estimated by Eric Ettlinger, an aquatic ecologist with MMWD, to be over 40 inches long, and probably a steelhead, coming upstream to spawn. The camera, equipped with a motion detector, has also recorded an otter and several ducks. Friends president Gerhard Epke, who lives by San Anselmo Creek, has set up the camera in various locations near his home.

Talking Trash
Two miles of the Corte Madera Creek estuary are 148 lbs. cleaner of trash, thanks to volunteers who turned out on California’s Coastal Cleanup Day in September, an event presented by the Coastal Commission, the California State Parks Foundation and the Ocean Conservancy. Students from San Domenico School, pictured, comprised many of the local volunteers, organized by Nick Salcedo of Friends of Corte Madera Creek Watershed. Photo by Ann Thomas

Two miles of the Corte Madera Creek estuary are 148 lbs. cleaner of trash, thanks to volunteers who turned out on California’s Coastal Cleanup Day in September, an event presented by the Coastal Commission, the California State Parks Foundation and the Ocean Conservancy. Students from San Domenico School, pictured, comprised many of the local volunteers, organized by Nick Salcedo of Friends of Corte Madera Creek Watershed. Photo by Ann Thomas

San Anselmo’s Long History of Flooding

Judy Coy of the San Anselmo Historical Museum has gathered newspaper reports and photographs of historical flooding in downtown San Anselmo and presents her findings on the museum’s excellent website Sananselmohistory.org/articles/flooding/. Nine floods between 1921 and 2005 caused considerable damage as well as excitement.

A crowd gathers on the embankment built for the railroad tracks which formerly ran down Center Boulevard, to watch flooding on Sycamore Avenue in 1925. The side of Red Hill is visible in the upper left of the photo. Photo courtesy of San Anselmo Historical Museum

A crowd gathers on the embankment built for the railroad tracks which formerly ran down today’s Center Boulevard, to watch flooding on Sycamore Avenue in 1925. The side of Red Hill is visible in the upper left of the photo. Photo courtesy of San Anselmo Historical Museum

Community Service Day on the Estuary

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On April Fool’s Day nearly 80 students from Marin Country Day School spread out along the edges of Corte Madera Creek to gather litter from amongst pickleweed and saltgrass. Hardly any large pieces of garbage were found, but many small fragments were on their way to harming maritime wildlife in one way or another until they were picked up. Memorable finds were an unopened liquor bottle and two insulin syringes.

A student marvels at a sprouting log. Photos by Charles Kennard

A student marvels at a sprouting log. Photos by Charles Kennard

Neighbors Tend Native Plants at Lansdale Station
In February, neighbors and others attended a Friends' workday to remove non-native blackberry and three species of ivy from our project upstream of Center Boulevard. Above, Sarah, Ceci and Milo Wotherspoon work amongst sedge and rush plants. Photo by Charles Kennard

In February, neighbors and others attended a Friends’ workday to remove non-native blackberry and three species of ivy from our project upstream of Center Boulevard, in San Anselmo. Above, Sarah, Ceci and Milo Wotherspoon work among sedge and rush plants. Photo by Charles Kennard

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